Rappers with street cred

But listen to it, and I mean REALLY listen to it. Does that C minor chord sound like home, or just a temporary passing chord on its way to the dominant? I respect those who feel differently, but my ears practically beg it to go to that E♭ and it doesn’t, which is why I dig it.

“Without Me”: To start, we have an arpeggiated riff making some jazzy tetrads: E♭m to G♭add9 and D♭ to A♭m7, and then watch out at the end of the bridge when they sneak in a C♭m. The first two choruses extend from eight to twelve bars by repeating their second halves, which I think creates a kind of pang of abandonment at the end of the song when the repetition doesn’t come back. Another thing about these choruses is how their stanzas all begin and end in the middle of the bars. Most lyrics begin and end near the bar line, so when we hear lyrics phrased all off-center like this, we can’t tell whether we’re being rushed or being left behind. Do I smell a songwriter’s homework assignment?

Especially during the dry winter season, soups are great for staying warm and hydrated. Broth soups with bases of miso, garlic, or vegetable are wonderful for the voice. They’ll help you avoid vocal fatigue, decreased range, inflammation, vocal loss, and a plethora of health issues that are caused by dehydration such as problems with digestion, acid reflux, allergies, and mental and emotional imbalances that manifest in the brain due to reduced blood supply. Just stay away from anything tomato- or cream-based, as they cause reflux.

Pabst blue ribbon coffee

The best way we’ve found to practice identifying note intervals by ear is to associate each interval with a familiar song or melody that you could likely sing in your head already. All you have to do is commit a piece of the melody to memory, and voilà, you’re on your way to interval recall!

The color scheme on the aQWERTYon pitch wheel is intended to give you some visual cues about how each scale sounds. Green notes are “bright” (i.e., major, natural, sharp, or augmented). Blue notes are “dark” (i.e., minor, flat, or diminished). Purple notes are neither bright nor dark (i.e. perfect fourths, fifths and octaves). Grey notes are outside the selected scale. Finally, orange notes are the ones that you are currently playing.

Somehow, this video perfectly portrays the combined joy and sorrow of the song. The random intervention of the weather actually helped to make it even more fitting than the original concept. It’s so simple yet powerful, and it proves that lots of money is not essential for developing a great music video.

In a song that was spliced together from the independent compositions of different feuding band members, John McVie’s contribution takes prominence here at the end. Played along an E minor scale, it starts with a long A and ascends to the C, before descending via a run of notes to resolution on the E. Simple yet effective, especially with the repetition, it builds up with intensity into a driving tempo over Mick Fleetwood’s drums. But one thing that shouldn’t be overlooked is how much musical tension is created between the bass and the lead guitar as a result of what I call “reverse” pedal point.

And Ischi really did have the chops! Check out this live performance from 1983, where he sings one of Lang’s own classic tunes, “Mein Vater Ist Ein Appenzeller.”

Jazz music grants

Not much is known about Agnesi’s life after she married Pier Antonio Pinottini and took his name, and much of her music is either lost or undated. However, we do know that she received generous compositional patronage from Holy Roman Empress, Maria Theresia Walburga Amalia Christina, and another female noble composer, Maria Antonia Walpurgis. The Holy Roman Empress apparently sung Agnesi Pinottini’s music publicly. There is a story that Agnes Pinottini was part of an organizational committee that invited the 14-year old Mozart to play in Milan in 1770 and present at his performance. She composed some operas, as well as quite a bit of keyboard and vocal music for small chamber ensembles.

More and more musicians are choosing to build their own home studios and go it alone these days, as opposed to spending their money on only a few days in a professional studio per year or even less. And that’s great! More agency and self-sufficiency means more time spent honing one’s craft and exploring musical boundaries.

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Once you get a motif, you can repeat it. A very good idea: Repetition is the songwriter’s friend. The more times you repeat the motif within a song the more easily it will be remembered. And you can repeat it at either the same pitch or at a different one.

Here’s a quick video full of tips about how to reach out to venues you’ve never played at, courtesy of Soundfly’s free online course on DIY booking, management, and promotion, Touring on a Shoestring.