Federal grants for college

“The title says it all. Break out the crayons, ’cause it gangsta rap coloring time! 48 pages of line drawings of “Gangsta” rappers, done with the thick black line we all remember from the coloring books of our youth. The juxtaposition of the outlaw image of the rappers with the childlike innocence of a coloring book makes for an instant laugh.”

[AC]: “If you imagine you are participating in one of these experiments, you’ll get played a short melodic excerpt, say, a scale, then you get played a tone. And then you have to rate on a scale of 1-7 how well you think the tone fits with the music that was played before. Based on those ratings, you can order basically how well people think various tones fit in with the same context.”

Sırma loves working with students at the intersection of songwriting and production, helping them figure out how to produce the sounds they hear in their heads using the software at their fingertips. In particular, she specializes in vocal production.

2000s hip hop artists

With social media promotion becoming trickier and harder to do for free, band websites are more important now than ever. From selling merch with no middleman to promoting a new release and upping your SEO game, personalized music websites are crucial in helping get the job done right. But how exactly do you “personalize” a website? Social media platforms are great for promotion because they’re so easy to use, but websites are much tricker to customize and update.

Ian is a pianist, entrepreneur and professional musician. He started Soundfly to help people really find what gets them most excited musically and pursue it. He’s toured all over the world with his experimental trio Sontag Shogun. Check out his most recent course Building Blocks of Piano or follow him on Twitter at @ianrtemple.

From an artist’s perspective, countless hours go into creating music, perfecting a set, and bringing it to the stage — and that should speak for itself, right? It might be nice to fantasize about a world where musicians just show up to play and crowds miraculously appear, but that obviously isn’t how things work. Venues need bands to do much more than just show up and play great music, and all that starts with getting your foot in the door in the first place!

As mentioned before, Berg was looking to push these techniques to their limits — not only in terms of scope, but also intent. The trajectory of this orchestral inversion actually mirrors the trajectory of the story.

One of Sırma’s early musical experiences involved placing 3rd at a professional jazz singing contest at 18, after which she was invited to represent Turkey in the World Choir for the 2010 World Cup song “Oh Africa.” For the recording session and the music video shoot, Sırma had to interrupt her first semester at Berklee for a week and fly to LA to work with Akon and Keri Hilson. Fresh out of high school and immediately faced with a packed schedule, she then understood the true meaning of being a professional musician today: always being prepared to seize any and every opportunity.

Namm foundation grants

I don’t know what it is about this West Virginia University hub, but I have found time and time again that even bands without a huge national following can attract a packed, excited crowd in Morgantown. People just can’t get enough music here, and they’re welcoming enough to give you a shot and come to your show even if they’ve never heard your music. Plus, with West Virginia’s proximity to Pittsburgh, Washington, DC, Baltimore, and Columbus (not to mention all the other secret hot spots in Ohio), it’s an easy detour that will surely be worth the trip.

We look at Ligeti’s famous composition in order to decide how much, or how little, the use of music’s foundational parameters really matter in composing.

Whitney Houston was a definitely a great singer and an animated, entertaining performer, sure; she makes the song glimmer, but that’s not the only ingredient. The instrumentals, the lyrics, the melodies and harmonies, all have to match, and be enjoyable too. In this song, melody clearly plays a really important role. 

Whether that means using “children’s instruments” like toy pianos, ukuleles, tambourines, etc., or instruments that look and sound retro, like jangly Rickenbacker guitars, these elements help paint a delicate picture of the sound world you’re trying to create. As another example, my parents played a lot of country when I was growing up. So whenever I hear pedal steel guitars and tight harmonies, the combination always brings me back to my childhood living room.

“I Like It”: The intro here begins with a two-bar fade-in of non-loop material — yet even with these two bars, they still decide to keep the whole intro to a tidy eight bars. There’s a nice little post-verse thingy after the second verse. You can spot it by its chromatic walk-down piano motif, four quarter notes a step. This motif comes back for another post-verse that’s simply the title refrain a bunch, and then a half-chorus. Pretty inventive since half-choruses are rare, but here it’s easy to do as the chorus was already written in two parts!